Tactics RPG Hit Rate

There is still plenty to do before we have actually implemented a true “attack” ability. In this lesson we will determine what sort of chance there is that the unit will actually hit the target. Sometimes special status effects or abilities might alter the chances of hitting, but at a minimum we will take the angle of attack (front, side or back) into account. It is easier to hit an opponent if they don’t see the attack coming. In addition we will add another UI panel to indicate this new hit rate.

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Tactics RPG Status Effects

During our last lesson I suggested possible implementations for a few status effects, such as Haste, Slow and Stop. In this lesson we will actually add them. We will also learn how to manage the way multiple conditions might be keeping a status active. For some variation we will also add a Poison status effect and see how it can be tied to an item as an equip feature – a cursed sword.

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Tactics RPG Turn Order

As it is now, turns are completely linear as if our units were all standing in line. In a tactics battle, things are a lot more complex. Units with a higher speed stat should be able to act more quickly in general, but other exceptions to the rule might exist. Final Fantasy Tactics for example would include status effects such as Haste, Slow, or even Stop. In this lesson we will create a new class to determine when each unit on the board gets to take a turn while keeping things flexible enough to account for all of these types of scenarios.

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Tactics RPG Ability Area of Effect

To fully select targets for an ability we need a few more steps. We began with specifying a Range. In this lesson we will implent a variety of Area Of Effect components which are applied based off the selection from the range. In addition, each ability may have multiple “effects” – each of which may specify a unique set of valid targets. I will provide a couple of implementations for these as well, so that we can have a completed targeting selection loop in place.

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Tactics RPG Stat Panel

We’ve been modifying stats for a while now, but it’s not very desirable to have to switch the inspector to debug mode just to see their values. In this lesson, we will go ahead and create a Stat Panel view, which shows an avatar along with his or her name and a few important stats. There will actually be two of these panels, one for the currently active (or selected) unit and a second for the target of an action.

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Tactics RPG Jobs

In this lesson we will show how to define a variety of jobs and store their data as a project asset. Although we have done this before (with conversation assets), this time we will be creating prefabs programmatically. By choosing prefabs over scriptable objects, we have the ability to take advantage of components such as the features which we introduced in the previous lesson.

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Tactics RPG Items and Equipment

Now that we have stats, we will need new ways to modify them. Of course one way is through leveling up your character, but a potentially more fun way is by items. Equiping a sword which is not only cool looking but provides a great bonus to your ATK (attack) stat can be very rewarding. Likewise, when you are damaged in battle a health potion might be in order to boost your HP (hit points) stat. In this lesson we will examine a few ways to create items, both consumable and equippable, as well as how to manage your equipment.

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Tactics RPG Stats

In this lesson we will begin adding Stats to our game. Experience and Level are particularly important stats, so we will begin by focusing on those and show how we might distribute experience between heroes in a party. As enough experience is gained, the level of the hero can also be incremented. Along the way I will also address how one system might create an exception-to-the-rule in another system and offer a solution on how to allow them to interract while keeping things as decoupled as possible.

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Tactics RPG Conversations

This week we will implement the UI components from the previous lesson in a Conversation UI element which would appear as part of a cut-scene before and/or after battles. The panels will hold a little bit of text along with a sprite showing who is speaking. A bouncing arrow will indicate when there is more to read and using the input “Fire” event will cause the conversation to move on to the next message or the next character who will speak, etc. These panels can appear in any corner of the screen (which could indicate the direction of a speaking character relative to the player), and will animate in and out of the screen as needed.

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